Vermont Public is independent, community-supported media, serving Vermont with trusted, relevant and essential information. We share stories that bring people together, from every corner of our region. New to Vermont Public? Start here.

© 2024 Vermont Public | 365 Troy Ave. Colchester, VT 05446

Public Files:
WVTI · WOXM · WVBA · WVNK · WVTQ · WVTX
WVPR · WRVT · WOXR · WNCH · WVPA
WVPS · WVXR · WETK · WVTB · WVER
WVER-FM · WVLR-FM · WBTN-FM

For assistance accessing our public files, please contact hello@vermontpublic.org or call 802-655-9451.
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Vermont lawmakers want to phase out neonic insecticides to help pollinators

A corn field standing tall with the mountains in the background.
Amy Kolb Noyes
/
Vermont Public File
A new bill introduced in the legislature would phase out the use of neonicotinoids in agriculture. The group of pesticides have been shown to be harmful to wildlife.

A House lawmaker has introduced a bill that would phase out the use of neonicotinoids in agriculture.

The controversial insecticides, also known as 'neonics', coat most of the commercial corn seeds sold in Vermont. But some beekeepers say the chemicals are killing their bees.

Rutland-Bennington Rep. Robin Chesnut Tangerman says a similar law passed in New York State, making it easier for Vermont to address the issue.

“This is the first bill that has the potential to have a real impact on increasing pollinator health, and that’s possible by the fact that we are pairing with a much larger state to make that a reality," Chesnut Tangerman says.

Chesnut Tangerman says a state as large as New York banning neonicotinoids will force seed companies to offer products without the insecticides.

The bill proposes banning the sale and use of neonicotinoid-treated soybean or grain seeds. It also proposes outlawing the use of neonicotinoid pesticides.

The bill cites several scientific studies that show the substances harm pollinators, including honeybees, and contribute to reduced bird biodiversity.

Have questions, comments or tips? Send us a message.

Corrected: January 15, 2024 at 1:13 PM EST
An earlier version of this story incorrectly stated that neonicotinoids coated corn feed when they in fact coat corn seeds.
Howard Weiss-Tisman is Vermont Public’s southern Vermont reporter, but sometimes the story takes him to other parts of the state. 
Latest Stories