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Typhoon Haiyan: How To Help

Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan in the central Philippines coastal village of Capiz got some help Monday when a Filipino military helicopter brought some much-needed food.
Tara Yap
/
AFP/Getty Images
Survivors of Typhoon Haiyan in the central Philippines coastal village of Capiz got some help Monday when a Filipino military helicopter brought some much-needed food.

The State Department announced Monday that it is "cooperating with the Philippines Typhoon Disaster Relief Fund established by The mGive Foundation, a U.S. nonprofit organization" to collect donations for victims of the typhoon that struck the Philippines on Friday.

How to donate: mGive has a webpage here with details about aid organizations working in the Philippines and how to text $10 donations via cellphones or make donations online. Also, the State Department says, you can simply "text AID to 80108 to give a $10 donation to the mGive Philippines Typhoon Disaster Relief Fund."

Other aid organizations are also collecting, of course. There's a roundup with weblinks here. ReliefWeb, a digital service of the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs is pointing to Doctors Without Borders' appeal for donations.

As NPR's Kirk Siegler reported on Morning Edition, Filipino expatriates in the U.S. are also "turning their worry and stress into action, pounding the pavement to raise money for typhoon victims."

Our latest post about the disaster is here.

Note: While the World Meteorological Organization calls the storm Haiyan, in the Philippines it is known as Yolanda. As The Associated Press notes, "the Philippines has its own naming system."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Mark Memmott is NPR's supervising senior editor for Standards & Practices. In that role, he's a resource for NPR's journalists – helping them raise the right questions as they do their work and uphold the organization's standards.
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